Active leisure in the Leningrsd oblast

Leningrad Oblast is a region full of lakes and pine forests. Fans of active leisure love these places not just for their picturesque nature, but also for the opportunity to experience the extreme. One popular attraction is the Orekh Rope Course, which includes various courses with obstacles of varying difficulty. The cumulative course length totals over 3,000 metres. Those who love horseback riding will also find a lot to do while on holiday in Leningrad Oblast. Equestrian clubs in the area provide guests with a variety of riding trails and there visitors can learn how to build a bond with a horse and how to sit securely and comfortably in the saddle. Rafting aficionados can travel to the town of Losevo, located just a couple of hours from St. Petersburg. There they can choose the rafting programme that suits them best – family, classic or extreme. RTG TV host Nadezhd...

Now on air
19:45
Active leisure in the Leningrsd oblast
Active Recreation in the Hills of the Caucasus

The village of Guamka is considered one of the key places to visit by those looking for an active holiday in the foothills of the Caucasus. It is one of the best places for people that love extreme sports and recreational activities such as driving ATVs through canyons and gorges whose rocky terrain around Guamka is marked by a large number of mountain streams. RTG TV host Denis Golovko walked by the Sukhaya Balka water bed, went down a waterfall of boiling water and travelled up stone cliffs using an “iron road” or via ferrata. He flew from one rock to another with the help of a rope connecting them and is eager to share the impressions the adventure has made on him.

Now on air
20:00
Active Recreation in the Hills of the Caucasus
The Tauride palace

The Tauride Palace symbolises the triumph of Prince Grigory Potemkin, a favourite of Catherine II. He was the only person that the Empress trusted completely, not only with her heart, but with the empire as well. Potemkin was called the number two in government and the “uncrowned emperor” for the great services he provided the country. It is as if this monumental building strove to meet the strong personality of the Prince and became the standard of classical architecture in Russia at the turn of the 18th to 19th centuries. At this time many provinces were building estates with the very same six-column portico and triangular pediment, but the Tauride Palace was something special; the richness of the palace interior and its decoration evoked envy from even the most spoiled and extravagant of aristocrats. The 20th century breathed a whole new political life into the Tauride Palace when it ...

Now on air
19:45
The Tauride palace